Iterating UX

Thoughtful design as I experience it. | allandkwan.com

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In the Details: Clear Labeling

designaday:

Previously in Apple’s Mail application, to change the sort order of a mailbox, you would select “ascending” or “descending” from a menu. Of course, that comes with an expectation that users understand the meaning of those terms. I don’t believe average users do.

With Mavericks, Apple has improved the microcopy.

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Now the options in the menu are as clear as they can be. It takes a few more words, but that doesn’t hurt anything here.

Phonebloks. Interesting idea!  Not sure how realistic this is, but who knows?

Headlights

designaday:

In the iPhone app for the Automatic Link, when you scrolling through your trips, the car’s headlights come on and it drives alongside. After it stops for a second, the headlights turn off.

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Becoming a Great [Worker]

As one who has been in and out of the job search process, I’ve found that the question, “What does it take to get a job?” takes too high of a priority in the minds of young professionals.  Obviously, I may never know how every profession in the world works from the inside out, but at least from a my perspective as a designer, I would say that the bigger question we need to be asking ourselves is “What does it take to love what you do?”

Answering the original question is much too standard today.  And boring.  It consists of an ever-changing composition of a good resume and prime interview skills.  I believe that people need to dig a little deeper.

To be honest, this is the reason why companies lose out on talent with some of their new hires.  What they see on the resume, on the portfolio, or even in the interview, are often only the shiny glimpses of perfection that nobody truly has.  Yet, that is all that the applicant reveals to the interviewer(s) throughout the entire process.  So when it comes time to put the new person to the test, employers often don’t get what they expected.  The result is often a lazy, disinterested worker who just wants to watch the clock tick the whole day.  The spark that was once there left once the interview ended and the i’m-going-to-make-a-good-impression time was over.

It is for this very reason why I think the second question is a more important question to ask and answer.  Now, don’t get me wrong.  This question of “What does it take to love what you do?” is for both the applicant to ask him/herself, and for the employer to ask the applicant.  This question goes deeper than just getting the job.  When a person truly and fully understands what they love doing, it bleeds through.  So, when a person is asked about what they love, their words are evidenced by their actions.  Reading about related things, writing about related things, observing related things, and thinking over all of the above are the marks of a true, and passionate worker.  This is how we, as humans, work.  Our brains need to be exercised for our minds to expand, and we need to realize this.  It’s important!

Going back to how this relates to the job search, I will tell you that this mentality supremely benefits the chances of getting a job as well.  There’s a stark contrast between those who truly have a passion for what they do and those who try to fake that passion through the interview process.  I’m definitely not saying that faking it can’t be done, but it’s definitely something to look out for.  I think once people learn to embrace the “passion” side of the job more than the “getting” side of the job, then both the employee and the employer will win in the end.  Employees will love what they do, and employers will gain effective workers.  

Now… if only I could prove this and change the world.  Wouldn’t that be something?

Interesting idea.

The biggest problem for beginners at chess is remembering how each piece moves. I designed a set where the form of the piece itself provides a clue to the way it moves.

Interesting idea.

The biggest problem for beginners at chess is remembering how each piece moves. I designed a set where the form of the piece itself provides a clue to the way it moves.